Frequently Asked Questions About Emotional Trauma

frequently-asked-questions-about-emotional-trauma
Source: pexels.com

I was never snobbish when it came to fantasy books. I learned early that many books with bad blurbs still had an exciting plot; it would be crazy to judge them by their cover. Despite that, one of the books that I refused to re-read was New Moon, the second book in the Twilight Saga by Stephenie Meyer.

It was not because the writing or storyline was awful, all right? The plot focused on how Bella Swan’s character tried to cope with Edward Cullen’s lack – or any of his family members – in her life. It detailed how the heroin went as far as trying crazy stunts because that’s the only way she could somehow hear or imagine Edward. 

Objectively speaking, it was extremely good. Subjectively speaking, it was horrifyingly believable and hit closer to home than I would ever admit. You see, I was once like Bella. I got abandoned by a loved one; I did not know how to move forward for a long time. Unlike Bella, though, I was entirely alone – I did not have friends or family to gain support from. Hence, I went down the deeper end of the depression and emotional trauma.  

1. What can cause emotional trauma? 

 Emotional trauma can be caused by a single shocking, horrifying event that an individual witnesses or experiences.

frequently-asked-questions-about-emotional-trauma
Source: pexels.com

2. What are the three types of trauma? 

  • Acute: You experience one traumatic incident.
  • Chronic: You deal with the same traumatic event repeatedly.
  • Complex: You’ve been exposed to a broad range of traumatic events.

3. Can emotional trauma cause physical symptoms? 

 Yes, emotional trauma can cause physical symptoms, especially when you feel strongly towards a specific event. Your head may ache, and your chest may constrict, for instance.

4. How do you deal with emotional trauma? 

  • Let time heal your wounds. Avoid forcing yourself to get better – that will only result in the opposite.
  • Figure out the reason behind the trauma. No matter how painful it may feel, you must face your fears if you wish to overcome them.
  • Create and follow a schedule of activities every day. Doing so will allow you to move even when you don’t feel like it.
  • Open up about your traumatic experience(s). Family and friends may be the closest support group you can have. If that is not possible, you may look for organizations that cater to traumatized individuals.
  • Look for people who have been in your shoes before. Talk to them and learn how they have risen above the trauma.

5. How emotional trauma affects the brain? 

 Emotional trauma practically causes the brain to produce more cortisol – stress hormones – than usual. The longer you deal with it, the higher is the possibility of emotional trauma changing your brain function permanently.

6. What are the five stages of PTSD? 

  • Emergency: During the first stage, you have a fight-or-flight response to everything. You cannot stay still and may often react intensely.
  • Denial: The second stage occurs when the individual refuses to deal with his feelings and memories. This is when they drink, party, and try various activities to avoid confronting reality.
  • Intrusive: It is technically the scariest PTSD stage, considering nightmares and flashbacks may appear at this point. As a result, you may get more anxious than ever. The silver lining is that severe anxiety and stress may push you to accept your trauma.
  • Transition: Acknowledging PTSD serves like a balm to your trauma-addled brain. The path towards healing most likely becomes apparent in the fourth stage. Ideally, you also sign up for a recovery program.
  • Integration: When you reach this stage, it entails that you have graduated from the program and are ready to face life with new coping skills. It’s okay if it takes months before achieving it – what matters is that you’ve gotten here.
frequently-asked-questions-about-emotional-trauma
Source: pexels.com

7. Does trauma ever go away? 

 Given that trauma can alter brain function, it may never go away. However, if you learn to deal with the symptoms, they may become manageable over time.

8. Can Trauma be cured? 

 No, trauma is one of the many mental conditions that cannot be cured at the time of writing. Despite that, you can try various treatments to manage their symptoms.

9. How would you know if you have unresolved trauma? 

 If you have unresolved trauma, you may experience the following:

  • Black-and-white way of thinking
  • Irrational fears
  • Spacing out
  • Hypervigilance
  • Guilty for living
  • Attachment issues
  • Depression symptoms
  • Nightmares
  • Flashbacks
  • Suicidal thoughts

10. How would you know if you have repressed trauma? 

 If you have repressed trauma, you may experience the following:

  • Unexplainable physical pain
  • Mood swings
  • Heightened sensitivity
  • Lack of self-confidence
  • Insomnia
  • Nightmares
  • Worthlessness

11. What mental illness is caused by childhood trauma? 

 Childhood trauma can cause depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, eating disorders, and other mental illnesses.

12. What does emotional trauma feel like? 

  • Everything makes you anxious or depressed.
  • It is impossible to trust or get close to another person.
  • Terrifying flashbacks come to mind.
  • You become closed-off when you see or hear anything related to your traumatic experience.
frequently-asked-questions-about-emotional-trauma
Source: pexels.com

13. How long can it take to heal from emotional trauma? 

 It is impossible to mention how much time it takes to recover from emotional trauma. Every sufferer is different, so the answer depends on how much you’ve accepted the issue and how easy you cope with it.

14. How do you release trapped emotions?

  • Recognize that there is perhaps an emotion or two that you don’t want to deal with. Figure out what those are and accept them.
  • Learn how to express your emotions, even if you are not ready to use your words to do that. For instance, you may dance, smash things, paint, draw, exercise, or even cry. Many have also benefited from going out and taking a deep breath.
  • Look after your mind and body. Whatever you’ve done in the past most likely isn’t enough – you need to prioritize yourself this time.

Final Thoughts

You might be wondering, “How did you get over the emotional trauma, writer?”

Well, for starters, I moved to another state. I left everything behind that would remind me of that person who abandoned me. I also cut ties with all the people who kept telling me, “I told you so.” Once I got settled in my new home, I went to therapy. It was a long and challenging process; it took me more than a year, to be honest. Despite that, it was worth the effort as I managed to regain self-control and self-confidence and leave the past in the past.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *